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Thursday, December 15

  1. page Reproductive Evolution edited REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM EVOLUTION by Erin, Gabby EM, GA and Sam SM {IMG_0432.JPG} Meet our …

    REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM EVOLUTION
    by Erin, GabbyEM, GA and SamSM
    {IMG_0432.JPG}
    Meet our female fetal pig, Roxanne. She was taken from the uterus of a pregnant sow in a slaughterhouse. Her blood has been removed but her organs remain quite intact. Let's take a look at her reproductive system.
    (view changes)
    5:21 pm
  2. page Reproductive Evolution edited REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM EVOLUTION by Erin Mahoney Erin, Gabby and Sam Miller {IMG_0432.JPG} …

    REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM EVOLUTION
    by Erin MahoneyErin, Gabby and Sam Miller
    {IMG_0432.JPG}
    Meet our female fetal pig, Roxanne. She was taken from the uterus of a pregnant sow in a slaughterhouse. Her blood has been removed but her organs remain quite intact. Let's take a look at her reproductive system.
    (view changes)
    5:19 pm
  3. page S&F Gabby Esophagus edited Structure and Function of the Esophagus: By: G Abrishamian Gabby What is the structure and f…

    Structure and Function of the Esophagus:
    By: G AbrishamianGabby
    What is the structure and function of the esophagus? {colorstomach-esophagus.jpg} Notice location of esophagus in relation to other major organs
    The esophagus is the tube that connects the pharynx (throat) with the stomach. It lies between the trachea (windpipe) and the spine. The trachea is covered by an epiglottis, a piece of cartilage in the pharynx, during swallowing to ensure that food goes down the esophagus into the stomach and not down the windpipe into the lungs. At the upper end of the esophagus is a sphincter, which allows food to enter a It passes down the neck, through a whole in the diaphragm, and joins the cardiac (upper) end of the stomach. In an adult, the esophagus is about 25 centimeters (10 inches) long. When a person swallows, the muscular walls of the esophagus contract to push food (bolus) down into the stomach through the pyloric sphincter. Glands in the lining of the esophagus produce a mucus, which keeps the passageway moist and facilitates swallowing. At the upper and lower ends of the esophagus are muscles called sphincters. The upper esophageal sphincter opens to allow food to enter and helps move food down the esophagus. The lower esophageal sphincter keeps stomach acid from splashing up into the esophagus (refluxing).
    (view changes)
    5:19 pm
  4. page Reproductive Evolution edited REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM EVOLUTION by Erin Mahoney, G Abrishamian, Mahoney and Sam {IMG_0432.JPG}…

    REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM EVOLUTION
    by Erin Mahoney, G Abrishamian,Mahoney and Sam
    {IMG_0432.JPG}
    Meet our female fetal pig, Roxanne. She was taken from the uterus of a pregnant sow in a slaughterhouse. Her blood has been removed but her organs remain quite intact. Let's take a look at her reproductive system.
    (view changes)
    5:18 pm
  5. page Reproductive Evolution edited REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM EVOLUTION ... Erin Mahoney, Gabby G Abrishamian, and {IMG_0432.JPG} …

    REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM EVOLUTION
    ...
    Erin Mahoney, GabbyG Abrishamian, and
    {IMG_0432.JPG}
    Meet our female fetal pig, Roxanne. She was taken from the uterus of a pregnant sow in a slaughterhouse. Her blood has been removed but her organs remain quite intact. Let's take a look at her reproductive system.
    (view changes)
    5:17 pm
  6. page S&F Gabby Esophagus edited Structure and Function of the Esophagus: By: Gabby G Abrishamian What is the structure and f…

    Structure and Function of the Esophagus:
    By: GabbyG Abrishamian
    What is the structure and function of the esophagus? {colorstomach-esophagus.jpg} Notice location of esophagus in relation to other major organs
    The esophagus is the tube that connects the pharynx (throat) with the stomach. It lies between the trachea (windpipe) and the spine. The trachea is covered by an epiglottis, a piece of cartilage in the pharynx, during swallowing to ensure that food goes down the esophagus into the stomach and not down the windpipe into the lungs. At the upper end of the esophagus is a sphincter, which allows food to enter a It passes down the neck, through a whole in the diaphragm, and joins the cardiac (upper) end of the stomach. In an adult, the esophagus is about 25 centimeters (10 inches) long. When a person swallows, the muscular walls of the esophagus contract to push food (bolus) down into the stomach through the pyloric sphincter. Glands in the lining of the esophagus produce a mucus, which keeps the passageway moist and facilitates swallowing. At the upper and lower ends of the esophagus are muscles called sphincters. The upper esophageal sphincter opens to allow food to enter and helps move food down the esophagus. The lower esophageal sphincter keeps stomach acid from splashing up into the esophagus (refluxing).
    (view changes)
    5:16 pm

Sunday, February 3

  1. msg ALS message posted ALS As Ali noted above, ALS affects only voluntary nerves and muscles, and has no effect on any involun…
    ALS
    As Ali noted above, ALS affects only voluntary nerves and muscles, and has no effect on any involuntary nerves or muscles. I think this is very interesting, and points out an important aspect of the nervous system, the clear difference between voluntary and involuntary actions. There must be some significant structural or chemical difference between these two kinds of nerves that explains this discrepancy. I looked at several sites, including those cited earlier in this forum, but I could find no reason why this occurs. I wonder if it has to do with which region of the brain connects to the involuntary nerves as opposed to the voluntary. Or perhaps it has more to do with the difference between involuntary smooth and cardiac muscle tissue and voluntary skeletal muscle tissue. This feature of ALS helps make it such an interesting disease, and the way that it connects several body systems makes it relevant to this discussion.
    8:27 pm
  2. msg Diabetes message posted Diabetes In response to Stella's post about diabetic kidney disease and how diabetes affects the excretory s…
    Diabetes
    In response to Stella's post about diabetic kidney disease and how diabetes affects the excretory system, I looked up some more information about this complication and its causes. It turns out, the medical name of diabetic kidney disease is Diabetic Nephropathy. It is similar to kidney diseases that are not related to diabetes, but it is very common in diabetics. Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of kidney failure, the final stage of kidney disease in which the organs lose their ability to filter waste almost totally, and either dialysis or transplant is needed. One of the earliest symptoms of diabetic nephropathy is an increased presence of blood proteins in the urine, because of a lack of filtration. This can be detected in a simple urine test, and is usually the method used to diagnose the disease. With type 1 diabetes, nephropathy is usually slow to develop, and risk factors such as diet and smoking can be prepared for. However, with type 2 diabetes, nephropathy often develops very quickly and can degenerate to kidney failure in only a few years.
    Two good sources on diabetic nephropathy are:
    http://diabetes.webmd.com/diabetes-kidney-disease
    and
    http://www.lifeclinic.com/focus/diabetes/dia_kidney.asp
    8:06 pm
  3. msg Diabetes message posted Diabetes People have already posted about some of the ways that diabetes affects the nervous system, mostly …
    Diabetes
    People have already posted about some of the ways that diabetes affects the nervous system, mostly in unclear or unproved examples. However, one clearly established negative effect is that on the eyes and the optic nerves. The detrimental effect of diabetes on the blood supply and circulatory system has already been discussed here, and these problems harm the optical nerves by altering the supply of glucose in the blood to the nerves. This can lead to several eye diseases and disorders. Glaucoma, retinopathy, and cataracts are all far more common in diabetics than in the general population, and diabetes is actually the most common cause of blindness in America (http://diabetes.webmd.com/eye-problems). Even without causing a major eye problem, the increased level of glucose in the blood causes the lens to expand, resulting in blurred vision. Another source of information on diabetes and eye disorders is http://www.diabetes.org/type-1-diabetes/eye-complications.jsp
    7:49 pm
  4. msg Osteoperosis message posted Osteoperosis Well I just thought that I would add in that osteoporosis also affects the muscular system because …
    Osteoperosis
    Well I just thought that I would add in that osteoporosis also affects the muscular system because bones help maintain the shape of the body and when that shape is gone, they can no longer work as well.
    7:28 pm

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